Four Tet on the power of Twitter

I was listening to Four Tet in conversation with Benji B recently, and was interested to hear him talk about connecting and collaborating with other musicians through Twitter. I grabbed an extract as I thought it could be useful to play to next year’s students:

For further musings, it’s worth listening to the whole thing – especially from around 15:40 to 18:15, where he talks specifically about collaborations and the web. Here’s the full chat:

Advertisements

Running a module as an ARG a.k.a. The Rufi Franzen Mystery

So the secret’s out. We’ve had the Big Reveal.

#psvtam (otherwise know as the BSc Professional Sound and Video Technology, Advanced Multimedia module) was a game – an alternate reality game.

A game that took so many unanticipated twists and turns that I’m still trying to process everything. For the past 48 hours I’ve been replaying the past 3 months in my mind, thinking about every clue, red-herring, reaction… wow. Continue reading

The Joy of Teaching: Learning Journeys and Transformations

One of my undergraduate students posted his weekly course reflections earlier this evening, and I was really moved by this post – extract:

“I cannot shake the growing feeling of “loss” which comes from moving to another semester and the introduction of new lecturers and their module content whilst in the same breath saying goodbye to the friends I have made.”

Continue reading

The Paradox of Openness: Attribution (network ‘whispers’)

In a series of posts around our ALT-C symposium (The Paradox of Openness: The High Costs of Giving Online), Frances Bell, Josie Fraser, Richard Hall and myself pose a range of issues for debate, provoking participants to reconsider the costs of participation online, openness, and the sharing of resources. Following on from my earlier post, which highlighted issues around the tyranny of authenticity, I’m now going to briefly explore ‘network whispers’. Ideas and content are shared easily through open platforms, and yet attributions can be masked in the flow of dissemination: does credit always go where it is due? Continue reading

The Paradox of Openness: The High Costs of Giving Online

At this year’s ALT-C conference, I’ll be contributing to a symposium session along with Frances Bell, Josie Fraser and Richard Hall. In our session, The Paradox of Openness: The High Costs of Giving Online, we will pose a range of issues for debate, provoking participants to reconsider the costs of participation online, openness, and the sharing of resources. I’ll be focusing practice-based scenarios based on the publishing and sharing of digital artefacts that highlight areas of uncertainty, risk and the personal cost of openness. In this post, i’m exploring ideas around:

The Tyranny of Authenticity (identity) Continue reading

Bringing the Social into the Sciences

Here are my Pecha Kucha slides from the Education in a Changing Environment Conference 2011. It’s a whistle-stop tour of the ways we are using social technologies in a traditional science faculty to develop a culture of learning through conversation and co-creation.

The Great Twitter Icon Experiment

So this is it, I’m having a ‘blog-off’ with @clintlalonde! Not as strange as it may sound – we basically started tweeting the other night about something which we both felt warranted more than 140 character exchanges, so we arranged to post our thoughts at the same time (PST/GMT). Here goes…

A few days ago Clint changed his Twitter icon. No big deal – except that it actually was. All of a sudden this guy whose tweets I follow, whose blog I’ve read… he seemed so ‘real’, it was as though this person was jumping out of the screen. So why the impact…? Continue reading